Hiking a Canyon or Two

For the first time in a long time, it hasn’t rained this May Long Weekend (even though rain was predicted!), so this called for a hike to the North Shore. Vancouvertrails.com is a great resource for finding hikes in the Greater Vancouver area based on region, level of difficulty, time, etc. My boyfriend and I did the Two Canyon Loop that takes you through Lynn Canyon and the Seymour River Canyon. It took about 3 hours. We parked at the Seymour-Capilano Water Treatment Plant and went clockwise so that we ended with the Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge (which is a great and free alternative to the more famous Capilano Suspension Bridge).

IMG_7822The hike was labelled “Intermediate” and for a while we were wondering why because it seemed more like a walk than a hike, especially as the beginning was all downhill along the Homestead Trail that led into the Seymour River Canyon. We took a few detours to enjoy a peek of the rushing river:

IMG_7797IMG_7803IMG_7805The Homestead Trail meets the Baden Powell trail which we then followed to climb out of the Seymour Canyon.

IMG_7815After crossing a bridge over the Seymour River, the hike began to feel more “intermediate” with this steep set of stairs and then a number of switchbacks uphill to get out of the Seymour River Canyon.

IMG_7812Here’s the view once the ascent had plateaued a bit:

IMG_7814After crossing under these power lines, the Baden Powell Trail then takes you across a road through the forest toward Lynn Creek. There’s a section with wooden boardwalks to help prevent erosion of the trail.

IMG_7818IMG_7831Eventually we reached Twin Falls with a beautiful view of the waterfalls and a bridge that crosses over Lynn Canyon (foreshadowing the larger and more popular bridge to come).IMG_7834IMG_7830After climbing up a littler further and taking pictures of old trees and lettuce leaves, we reached the popular Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge.

IMG_7819IMG_7821IMG_7853This bridge sways 50 metres above the canyon and was built in 1912 when the Lynn Canyon Park opened. You can read more about it here. I didn’t find the bridge particularly scary, but then again, I like heights and happen to love bridges. Many people’s dogs, however, weren’t so keen on crossing a narrow, moving bridge jammed with traffic.

IMG_7843IMG_7850IMG_7838On the other side, The Ecology Centre is a good place to use a washroom that’s not an outhouse, get a snack, and take a break at one of the picnic tables. From there, it’s only about a 10 minute walk back to the water treatment plant where the loop began.

IMG_7852The Two Canyon Loop was a great activity on a sunny Saturday afternoon that lets you take in two rivers, numerous waterfalls, old logging forests, scenic views, and a suspension bridge—not bad if you like to see a lot in a relatively short amount of time!

IMG_7845

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